About

Helping new teachers get better and better teachers get great!

Our Mission

Let's get one thing straight. Teaching is the most important profession in the world. Perhaps in our ongoing pursuit to perfect our craft, we engage in professional development efforts that are a mile-wide and an inch-deep, gathering to discuss with colleagues the art of instruction but rarely having the opportunity to share real-time instruction with teaching peers. Busy schedules make traditional peer observation programs unwieldy. 

With the advent of the smart-phone, teachers can now easily share instruction by joining Fresh Eyes on Teaching.  With our exclusive, interactive platform, teachers can reciprocate feedback within or between schools and individually with teaching friends across the world to help each other hone the challenging aspects of pedagogy.  Rarely can such an authentic form of professional development be found. 

 

Teachers simply record instruction on their mobile devices and upload to their chosen video channel(s) by grade level or subject matter. Uploading and adding some interactive questions to lead the discussion forward help peer observers focus their feedback. This reciprocal process raises the bar of quality instruction.

With Fresh Eyes on Teachingteachers become the reluctant stars of the show because the focus is on them, not their students.  Teacher-observers want to see the teacher in action. By emphasizing instruction, the ultimate winners are the students.  Curricula is plentiful, but more emphasis needs to be placed on effective instruction.

JOIN FRESH EYES ON TEACHING AND BECOME THAT RELUCTANT TEACHING STAR!

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RESEARCH
Traditional peer observation programs, although well-intentioned, often fail to produce rich, star-studded outcomes.  Official teacher observations are typically done by individual administrators and can be frought with bias, while being infrequent and perfunctory. The Best Foot Forward Project performed by Harvard's Center for Education Policy Research asked the question: Can video technology improve classroom observation? The findings were positive.  Both teachers and administrators found benefits. 
SUBSCRIBE TO FRESH EYES ON TEACHING NOW!